InformationWeek: The CISO's Guide to the Software Supply Chain (March 21st)
MTTR vs. MTBF: What's The Difference?
IBM, Friday, May 12,2023
May 19, 2023,
Volume 302, Issue 3

Businesses rely every day on various systems and pieces of equipment to keep their operations running smoothly. But all systems inevitably require upkeep. It could be intangible software, like an IT service network that has accumulated enough bugs to break an important feature, sending developers scrambling for a fix. Or it could be a piece of physical equipment, like an ice cream machine in a fast food restaurant with a broken o-ring.

Eventually, everything breaks down, from multi-site IT systems down to individual light bulbs. Unplanned downtime can have catastrophic consequences, and it's up to facility maintenance engineers and technicians to plan ahead so that swift measures are taken to rectify a failure. The goal is to minimize downtime, reducing the costs associated with lost productivity, revenue or customer dissatisfaction.

Downtime can be minimized in many ways. For example, businesses can aim to reduce the amount of time it takes to repair a piece of equipment by having sufficient replacement parts accessible to technicians on-site. Or, they can observe repair processes to find faster ways to perform repairs or quicker ways to notify technicians. Even further, they can make investments in better-performing tools with longer lifespans to reduce the number of repairs needed.

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